Industry – Platform Magazine https://platformmagazine.org University of Alabama Wed, 20 Nov 2019 19:05:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 PR Undergraduate Degrees: How We Should Prepare Our Future Practitioners https://platformmagazine.org/2019/11/20/pr-undergraduate-degrees-how-we-should-prepare-our-future-practitioners/ https://platformmagazine.org/2019/11/20/pr-undergraduate-degrees-how-we-should-prepare-our-future-practitioners/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 19:05:01 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20942 Published on November 20, 2019, at 1:05 p.m. by Gabriel Wahl, Bloom Initiative Messaging Manager. San Diego State University’s School of Journalism and Media Studies considers its public relations emphasis a legacy program. With the most adopted PR textbook coming out of SDSU, as well as scholars like Dr. Glen Broom and David Dozier spending [...]

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Published on November 20, 2019, at 1:05 p.m.
by Gabriel Wahl, Bloom Initiative Messaging Manager.

San Diego State University’s School of Journalism and Media Studies considers its public relations emphasis a legacy program. With the most adopted PR textbook coming out of SDSU, as well as scholars like Dr. Glen Broom and David Dozier spending their careers on the mesa, the description fits. Today’s SDSU faculty see the label of a legacy program and think it is more about the future than the past.

For her part, PR professor Dr. Kaye Sweetser looks to build on the legacy from the ground up in her capstone PR campaign course. From day one of the course, Sweetser set the tone for the semester by establishing the “ground rules”: Class times are staff meetings, the 16-student class is an agency, and the agency has one executive and four managers. Self-reported timecards are due every Monday night and shared with every team member for accountability and transparency; peer evaluations are submitted and reviewed twice throughout the semester. The agency works for a client and is responsible for the research, planning, implementation and evaluation of a complete PR campaign.

Broom Initiative branded materials at the registration table

Using a service-based learning model for an external client, this semester the agency represented the Glen M. Broom Center for Professional Development in Public Relations. In their campaign, they launched the Broom Initiative. This umbrella project within the Broom Center invests in those taking initiative in PR, just as the service-based and experiential learning capstone course models. Young PR professionals in the course are treated and expected to perform as professionals throughout the semester. All 16 students collaborate in specified areas that suit their strengths in the RPIE process, but they also collectively work toward the same end goals: to uphold industry standards, to push the status quo in PR practices through fresh and rejuvenating perspectives, and to successfully complete a PR campaign fueled by theory and strategy for their client.

According to a 2015 study conducted for the American Association of Colleges & Universities, 60% of employers surveyed think all college students should complete a significant applied learning project before graduation. Whether it is called “project-based,” “active” or “experiential learning,” there is a universal value in this style of education.

“As lead executive for the agency, I spend most of my time managing the team, looking at the overall progress of the campaign and checking on each moving part,” said Paige Shewmaker. “This experience has prepared me to be able to multitask and prioritize while considering deadlines. I have learned a lot about myself and how I interact with my colleagues, and I will take the communication skills I have developed here to an agency position.”

A study published in the Journal of Public Relations Education found 84% of students surveyed reported a strong preference for service-learning courses to traditional lecture learning. Ninety percent of those responding believed they had learned more from the service-learning course than alternative course designs.

In Sweetser’s capstone course agency, there are a lot of those learning opportunities.

Young professional Gabriel Wahl speaks with Dr. Hongmei Shen about her connection to the late Dr. Glen Broom.

Folded into the semester campaign was the hosting of two elite professional events on the sidelines of the Public Relations Society of America International Conference. The team planned events for the PRSA Educators Academy and the Commission on Public Relations Education: CPRE’s West Coast Industry/Education Summit and PRSA’s Educators Academy Super Saturday as key tactics in the Broom Initiative campaign. A total of 152 CEOs, vice presidents, members of the PRSA College of Fellows, educators and practitioners attended these events.

The Broom Initiative was responsible for pre-event logistics, pre-event social media content, event day logistics, a social media takeover for PRSA Educators Academy, a day-of social media campaign for the Broom Center, various interactive activities including virtual reality, and more.

All the while the young professionals were challenged to remember the tactics were not the campaign. The tactics were ways the team could strategically promote the launch of the Broom Initiative.

“As a professor in the campaigns journey, you always work to keep the team’s eye on the big picture of the campaign,” said Sweetser. “It would be easy to get caught up in the events only. But we aren’t teaching party planning. We are teaching strategic PR. The events are just ways to attract your publics to you.”

A study led by Dr. Brigitta Brunner content-analyzed 199 entry-level employment job advertisements posted to the Public Relations Society of America Job Center. Major findings included the need for graduates to possess not only hard skills, such as writing, but also soft skill abilities, such as time management, deadline orientation and collaboration.

In Sweetser’s capstone course agency, team members do peer evaluations twice during the campaign. At the campaign midpoint, before implementation, Sweetser privately meets with every team member to conduct a professional performance review.

“I have had a few internships, but they typically only tell me that I’m doing great and rarely give constructive feedback,” said Lexi Cook. “This was a great opportunity for me to sit down to discuss how I can improve as a professional. I heard how great I am, but I also got actionable advice on how I can be better.”

The capstone’s young professionals pose for a team photo in front of historic Hardy Tower, SDSU.

As evidenced from the Broom Initiative campaign, students gain experience in leadership, time management, deadline orientation, collaboration, event planning, research practices, digital media practices, strategic communications theories, the ability to interact with elite-level professionals and how to take initiative.

This investment in the agency-style experiential learning model is how Sweetser’s course is creating future PR icons and how SDSU is keeping that legacy title.

“We are using the pedagogical techniques Dr. Glen Broom loved,” said Sweetser. “We are helping them take steps forward to become their best professional selves.”

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Check Your Work Before You Hand It In https://platformmagazine.org/2019/11/15/check-your-work-before-you-hand-it-in/ https://platformmagazine.org/2019/11/15/check-your-work-before-you-hand-it-in/#respond Fri, 15 Nov 2019 16:46:58 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20877 Published on November 15, 2019, at 10:45 a.m. by Kennedy Schwefler. Public relations professionals are expected to develop creative, new ideas for campaigns. At the same time, they are tasked with protecting their organizations’ brands. If there isn’t a diverse group of leaders at the table, it is more likely that an idea may be [...]

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Published on November 15, 2019, at 10:45 a.m.
by Kennedy Schwefler.

Public relations professionals are expected to develop creative, new ideas for campaigns. At the same time, they are tasked with protecting their organizations’ brands.

If there isn’t a diverse group of leaders at the table, it is more likely that an idea may be miscommunicated and turn into a crisis. What may have seemed like a harmless idea for a commercial, social media post or a full campaign can backfire and harm the company’s image instantly.

Here are three examples of companies that didn’t think long and hard enough about their message strategy:

Photo by Akshay Bandre on Unsplash

1. Dove

Campaign: Dove developed a gif for its Facebook page of a black woman taking off her shirt to reveal a white woman.

Reactions: The public took to their own social accounts which sparked conversation about how the ad looked like the black woman was changing into a white woman after using Dove’s body wash.

How the company responded: Dove posted messages on its Twitter and Facebook accounts apologizing for “missing the mark in representing women of color.”

End game: The hashtag #BoycottDove spread like wildfire the next Monday, two days after the gif was posted.

2. Just For Feet

Courtesy of Just For Feet

Campaign: Saatchi & Saatchi created a Super Bowl ad for shoe retailer Just For Feet. The ad featured a Kenyan runner being followed by a group of white men in a Hummer. They drugged him, he falls asleep and they put Nike running shoes on his feet. The runner wakes up and tries to shake the shoes from his feet.

Reactions: The public was astounded at how racist this commercial was.

How the company responded: Just For Feet sued Saatchi & Saatchi for advertising malpractice, as well as Fox, the network that aired the Superbowl.

End game: Just For Feet went bankrupt and whatever remained was sold for very little profit.

3. Pepsi

Photo by Ja San Miguel on Unsplash

Campaign: In the climax of the Black Lives Matter campaign, Pepsi developed a commercial with protestors holding signs that read “Join the conversation.” At the end, there is a line of police standing in front of the protestors. Kendall Jenner walks out of the crowd, hands one of the police a Pepsi, he drinks it, and everyone cheers.

Reactions: People reacted online and shamed Pepsi for how unrealistic the commercial was in relation to the Black Lives Matter protests. The most impactful tweet compared a picture of Kendall Jenner in the commercial to a Black Lives Matter protester.

How the company responded: Pepsi sent out a tweet responding to Martin Luther King Jr.’s daughter’s reaction that reads: “Pepsi was trying to project a global message of unity, peace and understanding. Clearly we missed the mark, and we did not intend to make light of any serious issue.” The company removed the commercial from all platforms.

End game: The commercial received loads of negative attention because of its insensitivity as well as social media comments from celebrities and influencers.

We can only assume the groups approving these commercials were not including a diverse set of voices. If they had, they would not have posted or aired any of those campaigns. These decisions ended up hurting not only the brands, but also people of color.

These examples serve as a lesson to public relations professionals everywhere: Include diverse voices and tailor your message strategies based on their wants and needs.

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The Relationship Between CSR and PR https://platformmagazine.org/2019/11/15/the-relationship-between-csr-and-pr/ https://platformmagazine.org/2019/11/15/the-relationship-between-csr-and-pr/#respond Fri, 15 Nov 2019 02:18:11 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20894 Published on November 14, 2019, at 8:20 p.m. by Louise Margeson. Today, more than ever, consumers want to invest their time and money in brands that are socially, ethically and environmentally conscious. According to a 2015 study, “91% of global consumers expect companies to do more than just turn a profit, but also operate to [...]

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Published on November 14, 2019, at 8:20 p.m.

by Louise Margeson.

Today, more than ever, consumers want to invest their time and money in brands that are socially, ethically and environmentally conscious. According to a 2015 study, “91% of global consumers expect companies to do more than just turn a profit, but also operate to address social and environmental issues.” Accordingly, there has been a major increase in the use of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives among Fortune 500 companies and startup brands alike. By identifying effective partnerships based on shared values, brands have the ability to make a major impact, not only on their relationships with consumers, but on society as a whole.

Lauren Reveley, who considers herself a “marketing activist,” is on a mission to do just that. Reveley is the founder and CEO of Rose Street Creative, a marketing and public relations agency based out of Laguna Beach, California, that seeks to spotlight, grow and scale companies that are actively giving back. Through services such as content development, event marketing and brand recognition, Rose Street Creative helps brands use CSR to establish and maintain loyal relationships with their consumers.

Photo by Mimi Thian on Unsplash

According to Reveley, “CSR is something that can be beneficial for every single company, no matter the size, the scale, the goals or the product, and it can be customized to the brand.”

In terms of campaign generation, Rose Street Creative begins with its client’s values, mission and vision. “It’s a lot like freshman year English class: ethos, pathos and logos,” explained Reveley. “We want to connect with consumers on an ethical level to convince them that we are credible. Next, we want to appeal to their emotions. What does our market care about? How do they want to make a difference? Lastly, we want to appeal to the consumer’s logic. A really important part of establishing a strategic partnership is that it makes sense in a way that stays true to a brand’s mission.”

One of the largest advantages of establishing a CSR initiative is its influence on a brand’s relationship with its target market. Campaigns that exhibit longevity are typically the most effective, according to Reveley.

“The best partnerships are not just a one time thing — it’s not just one magazine article, press release or sponsored event. They last years. They can grow with a brand, sometimes even throughout the lifetime of that brand. Every company wants consumer loyalty, but at the end of the day, if you want loyalty, you have to exhibit loyalty,” she explained.

Church’s Chicken’s partnership with No Kid Hungry, an organization that aims to end childhood hunger in the United States, exemplifies the effectiveness of a long-term campaign that “makes sense.” Church’s initially partnered with the nonprofit in 2016, and is now approaching the $1 million mark in donations. In 2018, this accomplishment earned the fast-food brand No Kid Hungry’s first Newcomer of the Year Award.

This partnership was the first time the food retailer rolled out a consumer-facing promotion, which was executed in all of the company’s owned restaurants, as well as a select number of participating franchise locations.

Photo by You X Ventures on Unsplash

“Through this partnership, we learned that this was a cause that our team members could rally around. We got a lot of positive feedback, not only from the people that work in our restaurants, but from the customers that visited them,” said Georgia Margeson, director of creative services at Church’s Chicken. “Our target market is lower to middle income level families, and these are the people that benefit from the programs that No Kid Hungry establishes.”

Initially, the core component of this promotion was Church’s sale of coupon booklets, which were a dollar each and included over $20 in savings. However, due to the program’s success, the company has incorporated a more hands-on approach to the CSR initiative. At Church’s yearly leadership conference in Houston, Texas, hundreds of general managers came together from all over the country to pack backpacks of nonperishable items to deliver to schools within the community.

By strategically partnering with No Kid Hungry, Church’s approach to impact serves as a direct reflection of its values — and the values of its customers, employees and management. The brand is able to give back to its communities and get its target consumers involved in a cause that is important to them.

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

“This partnership is a great fit for us, so, in 2019, Church’s decided that No Kid Hungry was going to be our sole cause in terms of CSR initiatives,” stated Margeson. “Any money we raise internally or through consumer-facing promotions is going to go back to the nonprofit.”

Companies that are socially conscious will continue to stand out as younger generations recognize the importance of investing in brands that value CSR and want to make a positive impact.

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Agency Spotlight: Octagon https://platformmagazine.org/2019/10/30/agency-spotlight-octagon/ Wed, 30 Oct 2019 15:56:50 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20753 Published on November 5, 2019, at 8:30 p.m. by Louise Margeson. In the business of college and professional sports, sponsorship is one of the most effective ways to drive fan engagement for brands within the industry and beyond. Sponsorship is when a business provides funds or services to a club in return for some form [...]

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Published on November 5, 2019, at 8:30 p.m.

by Louise Margeson.

In the business of college and professional sports, sponsorship is one of the most effective ways to drive fan engagement for brands within the industry and beyond. Sponsorship is when a business provides funds or services to a club in return for some form of rights or associations with the club that may be used to help the business commercially. Utilizing sponsorships results in mutually beneficial relationships, as consumers are able to recognize the shared passion between themselves as fans, and the sponsoring brand can align its message with a target audience.

 

Courtesy of Octagon

Octagon can attest to the effectiveness of sponsorship as the world’s largest sports and entertainment agency with over 30 years in sports marketing, sponsorship and athlete/talent representation. Boasting talent such as Stephen Curry, Trae Young, Simone Biles, Nancy Lieberman, and Heidi and Spencer Pratt, the agency has solidified its position as one of the best in the industry. Octagon even received Sports Business Journal’s award for Best in Corporate Consulting in 2018, among others. Some of the agency’s largest clients are Mastercard, BMW and Bank of America.

“We’re ultimately looking to find the right partnerships for our clients to reach consumers in a meaningful way by identifying where they should invest their sponsorship dollars, how they should go about doing so and measuring the return,” explained Kevin Wittner, Octagon’s vice president of analytics. Wittner primarily works with the Delta Air Lines, Taco Bell and MGM Resorts accounts.

In order to generate strategic campaigns for Octagon’s clients, the agency starts by defining their goals and objectives. For example, who is the target consumer? From there, a program’s success comes from determining how to effectively align the client’s message with the target consumers in a way that will resonate in the long term. Storytelling is a large component of this strategy in terms of reaching consumers.

Courtesy of Kevin Wittner

“It’s not just slapping a logo on an event or a stadium, but finding ways to add to the fan experience and ultimately creating a relationship with that consumer. It’s saying we care about the same things that you do and getting the permission to talk to that consumer when they’re already engaged as a fan,” said Wittner.

One of the ways that Octagon adds to the fan experience on behalf of its clients is through experiential marketing. Bo Heiner, senior vice president of marketing and events, noted that “a sponsor at a college football game engaging a college football fan can have an intrinsic connection to their shared passion for college football. Experiential marketing also provides tangible measurement opportunities as brands can track the event engagement and create opportunities to extend the interaction post-event.”

Courtesy of Bo Heiner

Heiner, who was named to Sports Business Journal’s 2019 College Sports: Power Players list, leads many of Octagon’s largest clients out of Atlanta, including Georgia Power and The Home Depot.

The Home Depot exemplifies the agency’s effective use of experiential marketing through its sponsorship of ESPN’s College GameDay Built by The Home Depot. The brand’s target consumers are typically homeowners and individuals prone to taking on DIY projects; thus College GameDay’s Saturday morning broadcasting allows for a prime activation opportunity. These consumers are already engaged as fans guaranteeing a point of entry for The Home Depot. The partnership has received renowned praise, including the Cynopsis Sports Media Award: Best Use of Integrated Sponsorship for Broadcast.

Data analysis is an important resource to consider when playing matchmaker between a brand and a league/team, which is highlighted through Octagon’s use of analytics.

“Data and analytics are necessary to demonstrate both that you’re making the right investment in terms of reaching your target customer in the most effective way, but also demonstrating the results,” explained Wittner. “The way we want to use data is to optimize decision-making so that we’re putting together programs that are going to resonate with fans, and then the next time, whether that’s week two, month two or year two of a partnership, we’re going to be a better sponsor and find ways to connect with those fans.”

Octagon’s use of experiential marketing and data analytics when establishing sponsorships allows the agency to maintain its position as one of the industry’s major players.

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It’s Called a Style “Guide” for a Reason https://platformmagazine.org/2019/10/27/its-called-a-style-guide-for-a-reason/ Sun, 27 Oct 2019 19:04:06 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20633 Published on October 27, 2019, at 2:00 p.m. by Carlyle Ascik. On Aug. 28, 2019, a statement of under 280 characters caused an uproar in the communications industry. When the Associated Press (AP) Stylebook account tweeted a timely reminder about how its recent hyphen update pertains to football season, many journalists and public relations professionals alike took [...]

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Published on October 27, 2019, at 2:00 p.m.
by Carlyle Ascik.

On Aug. 28, 2019, a statement of under 280 characters caused an uproar in the communications industry. When the Associated Press (AP) Stylebook account tweeted a timely reminder about how its recent hyphen update pertains to football season, many journalists and public relations professionals alike took to Twitter panic-stricken.

The AP Stylebook is widely known as the premier style guide for news writing. The purpose of the book is to increase “consistency, clarity, accuracy and brevity.” However, oftentimes writers regard the statements in the book as hard and fast rules instead of simple style guidelines.

Photo by Lina Kivaka from Pexels

“Think about traffic laws,” said Merrill Perlman, the former director of copy desks at The New York Times. “They’re rules — but even if the speed limit is 55 there are times when, say if it’s snowing, you’re going to go 35. So, you’re not following the rules. You’re following the situation; you’re following what’s needed now.”

The same should go for the parameters in the stylebook. While it may be easier to teach, edit and write based on a set of concrete rules, style guides rely on the insights and judgment of the writer to decide what action is appropriate for the given situation.

Thus, changes to the AP Stylebook aren’t just made to disrupt the lives of our nation’s journalists. Since the first AP Stylebook was published in 1953, it has seen its share of both major revisions and slight edits. Throughout its history, the guide has continued to evolve alongside the communications industry.

With the rise of technology, more individuals than ever before are able to communicate with the editors at the Associated Press. Whether it’s through a tweet or a submission to “Ask the Editor,” there is an increasingly large number of avenues between the everyday writer and those writing the rules. While this open communication leads to more frequent updates to the stylebook, it also means those changes are more relevant and necessary to the readers.

When Perlman started out at The New York Times over 30 years ago, it was frowned upon to use “contact” as a verb. Despite the term being listed in the dictionary, she spent many years finding alternative phrases to replace the verb. However, with the rise of email communications and contact lists, the term eventually became widely accepted.

“Language changes because we think about the rule, and well it doesn’t fit here and I’m going to change that — and then people start talking,” said Perlman.

Despite his personal distaste for the recent percentage sign change, Seth Maxon, associate editor at Slate, recognizes that the change to its use is a sign of the times.

“The ubiquity of digital communication and social media has changed the way that people think about the norms of writing,” said Maxon. “When you’re typing, it’s faster to hit just one key than to type out a whole word. This is happening in a number of ways that the style guide has had to adapt to.”

Courtesy of The Associated Press

While some changes to the style guide are solely for the sake of clarity and conciseness, others are a reflection of major cultural and political changes in our nation. At this year’s Annual Conference of ACES: The Society for Editing, one of the main themes amongst AP style updates was race. From dual heritage hyphens to cultural group nicknames, the book editors made large strides in updating its race-related entries.

“It’s a reflection of what’s going on in the real world — in America,” said Maxon. “Not only online but everywhere, minorities or people who have been traditionally discriminated against have more access to authoritative positions and more of a voice than they have ever had before. I think it is laudable that the AP style is taking the concerns of these groups so seriously and incorporating them into the guide.”

Although these changes were positive in nature, they also seemed somewhat overdue. The debate between whether to use the term “Indians” or “Native Americans” is long resolved; however, this year’s stylebook is the first to recognize “Indians” as solely individuals from South Asia or India.

“Stylebooks follow, they don’t lead,” Perlman explained. “If a stylebook led, their audiences might not be familiar with things. For that reason, they are always somewhat lagging culture.”

Despite its timing, the AP Stylebook seems to have its finger on the pulse of society — and it’s not planning on becoming obsolete anytime soon.

“Companies use the stylebook as a way to keep their own copy consistent,” said Maxon. “It is not so much about right or wrong as it is giving the reader a consistent look, sound and set of meanings that they can rely on — whether they realize that they are or not.”

So, while it may be easy to complain about yet another change to this writing rulebook, remember to take a step back and understand the true purpose of any style guide. It is the responsibility of the writer alone to determine how to proceed based on both the guides laid out in the stylebook and the writer’s discretion in a given situation. So, write on, and always let the AP Stylebook be your guide.

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Saving Planet Earth: Environmental PR https://platformmagazine.org/2019/10/27/saving-planet-earth-environmental-pr/ Sun, 27 Oct 2019 14:15:41 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20640 Published on October 27, 2019, at 2:15 p.m. by Heather Griffin. The public relations industry provides many opportunities to follow your passions. You can choose to go into finance, fashion, consumer or even environmental public relations. Environmental PR is one of the lesser-known industries, yet it has an incredible impact on the world around us. [...]

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Published on October 27, 2019, at 2:15 p.m.
by Heather Griffin.

The public relations industry provides many opportunities to follow your passions. You can choose to go into finance, fashion, consumer or even environmental public relations. Environmental PR is one of the lesser-known industries, yet it has an incredible impact on the world around us. It brings to light pressing issues and allows PR practitioners to showcase how brands are addressing these issues.

Environmental PR serves two main functions in our society, one internal and one external. Its external role is to serve as an advocate for the environment. Practitioners who support this role often work in nonprofits, and their main job is to help environmentalism go mainstream. They work with and for nonprofits to raise awareness of the many issues our environment faces, in hopes of driving people to take action.

Photo by Nathan Ziemanski on Unsplash

Take the Save the Rainforests movement of the late 80s/early 90s, for example. Though this movement may not have actually saved the rainforests, it did leave a lasting impact on consumers — most millennials would tell you that they owned a Save the Rainforest T-shirt, had lunch at the quirky Rainforest Café or possibly even joined a protest march during their youth. What’s the reason behind these consumer choices? Good PR.

“Creating activism is a very different beast from creating a customer. You [have] to get inside a nascent activist’s head, take up space in there with imagery and facts about this wondrous place,” said Herbert Chao Gunter, the man at forefront of the Save the Rainforest’s movement and founder of the Public Media Center in San Francisco. “The activist organizations started with awareness; before you can make anyone care about the rainforest, you have to actually tell them about the rainforest, and why it’s so cool.”

Words are a powerful tool, one that public relations professionals use constantly. While it is the hope that every PR practitioner strives to use their words for good, people who work in environmental communications have a chance to not only make an impact, but to literally save the world. “Seeing what’s out there gives a lot of inspiration. The sky’s the limit,” said Molly Harrington, a former marketing and sustainability intern for a Fortune 100 corporation.

With climate activists like Greta Thunberg taking center stage in news cycles lately, environmental PR is becoming increasingly more important. According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, 74% of U.S. adults said that “the country should do whatever it takes to protect the environment.” This survey was conducted in 2017, prior to current trends in society, such as the Save the Turtles movement and the recent climate strikes inspired by Thunberg, both of which have undoubtedly helped propel environmentalism to center stage.

A key aspect of environmental communications is doing grassroots outreach to garner awareness of the cause being supported. Mary Beth Brown, communications director at Freshwater Land Trust, an environmental nonprofit based in Birmingham, Alabama, said that “a big part of my job is event planning and making sure we’re out in the community to make sure our people have the opportunity to interact with the public.” Brown believes this type of outreach helps organizations connect better with their key publics. “It’s very helpful as a communications professional to have something tangible you can touch and see and smell and feel and experience, and that brings a lot more life into our stories and how we talk about our work,” she explained.

However, it’s not all sunshine and rainbows for environmental communications. One of the biggest challenges PR practitioners face is finding ways to combine fundraising efforts with their awareness campaigns. Brown said, “My main role is creating strategies that are effective in telling stories, that resonate with folks and creating a brand that is visible and memorable and that draws people in. You have to figure out how to do that and at the same time raise money for your organization.”

While most people immediately think of nonprofits when they hear environmentalism, there are many corporations striving to

Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

decrease their impact on planet Earth, and they need someone to communicate these efforts to their publics. This effort could include communicating to employees that a corporation values environmentalism and that it wants to establish this value as a part of its company culture, or communicating to consumers that the corporation is dedicated to helping the planet.

Patagonia is one of the most well-known brands when it comes to environmental activism. The brand recently changed its mission statement to reflect its dedication, stating that “we’re in business to save the planet. At Patagonia, we appreciate that all life on earth is under threat of extinction. We aim to use the resources we have — our business, our investments, our voice and our imaginations — to do something about it.” The communication strategies being implemented at Patagonia are effective — the company’s revenue has quadrupled over the last 10 years, according to Fast Company.

Harrington believes that “in today’s society, there are a lot of green products, but there’s also the challenge of green-washing. Green-washing is a big challenge for corporations and small businesses because it can undermine everything.” Brands can no longer slap the words “eco-friendly” on a product in order to sell it; they have to live out the causes they support by considering their environmental impact from the beginning steps of their product development and in the ways they run their companies. “I loved seeing how much effort goes into creating a sustainable product,” said Harrington. When brands find ways to truly live out their environmental principles and beliefs rather than just marketing their products as green, they are able to stand out in a busy, green-washed market.

Despite being a relatively small industry, environmental communications has the power to influence generations and spark movements that could save the planet.

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That’s Showbiz Baby: Insider Advice for Succeeding in Entertainment PR https://platformmagazine.org/2019/10/24/thats-showbiz-baby-insider-advice-for-succeeding-in-entertainment-pr/ Thu, 24 Oct 2019 22:23:43 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20686 Published on October 24, 2019, at 5:30 p.m. by Gabrielle Sirois. The entertainment industry is one of the most high-profile industries worldwide. Many people in public relations are drawn to the entertainment industry for a chance to combine their PR skills with another one of their passions, whether it be pop culture, film, theater or [...]

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Photo by Krists Luhaers on Unsplash

Published on October 24, 2019, at 5:30 p.m.
by Gabrielle Sirois.

The entertainment industry is one of the most high-profile industries worldwide. Many people in public relations are drawn to the entertainment industry for a chance to combine their PR skills with another one of their passions, whether it be pop culture, film, theater or music. However, the entertainment industry is known for being a very fast-paced and difficult industry to succeed in. For people who are just starting out, the industry can seem very intimidating. It can be hard to figure out how to get your foot in the door, and what you should be doing in order to be successful.

Three industry professionals, Brynn White, a senior coordinator of field publicity and targeted marketing at Paramount Pictures, Michael May, a film assistant at PMK • BNC, and Olivia Montella, the director of global partnership strategy at BSE Global, weighed in and shared their experiences, advice and knowledge about the industry to provide insights for those who are looking to start their careers in entertainment.

Don’t be afraid to reach out to people you don’t know.
They say that in entertainment it is all about who you know, but what if you don’t know anyone? If you already have contacts at your potential places of work, then that is fantastic, but for a lot of people starting out, this is not the case. Don’t be afraid to contact someone you don’t know to start a conversation with them about their company and position.

Both Montella and May started their careers in entertainment with internships that they secured simply by making cold calls or emails. They did research to figure out where they wanted to end up, and who they needed to talk to in order to get there. As long as you have done your research and approach things professionally, you really have nothing to lose by taking the first step in making those connections.

“Network, network, network,” Montella said. “Make cold calls or send that LinkedIn message — you won’t always get a response, but don’t get discouraged when you don’t; someone will eventually answer.”

Photo by Dan Gold on Unsplash

Be open to new opportunities and embrace the unknown.
Don’t be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone and try something that you aren’t 100% sure about, because it might just be the perfect fit for you. White entered Paramount with no prior background in entertainment or in public relations. She had studied vocal performance and linguistics in college and hadn’t really considered working in entertainment until her friend, who had interned at Paramount, mentioned that there was a job open in the company and that she had recommended White for the role.

Though White was unsure due to her lack of experience, she knew that she had a passion for working events and thrived in fast-paced environments, so she decided to take a chance and interview for the position. She succeeded in the role by being a fast learner with a willingness to try new things.

Know that the entertainment industry never sleeps.
Entertainment is an extremely fast-moving industry, which means that those who are working in PR have to be ready to handle whatever comes their way almost 24/7. In order to be successful within entertainment, you have to be able to make some personal concessions and make yourself available at all times day and night.

White and Montella both mentioned there have been times when they have had to handle work calls or emails while on vacation. While that may sound ludicrous, it is simply the nature of the industry; you never know when something might come up and people need immediate answers from you.

Expect to be doing something different every day.
Another result of the fast pace of the entertainment industry is that there is no typical day for those who work in it. May said that some days he attends screenings or premieres while other days he may work events or spend the day in the office.

White noted that what surprised her most about working in the entertainment industry was the “huge scope of different elements that you always have to be ready for.” She explained, “I think I was just surprised that there really is no day to day, and there really is no ‘this is the definition of your job.’ Even if you are reading a job description online, that is just a small, small, small scope of the things you are going to be asked to do.”

Learn how to work well with others.
Being able to work with people from different backgrounds is important in all industries, but it is especially important in entertainment. The industry is very diverse, comprised of a lot of people with varying backgrounds, viewpoints and personalities. Specifically, with it being entertainment, a lot of these personalities are very large and outspoken. There are going to be difficulties that arise from these differences, so you have to know how to deal with people in a professional manner.

May emphasized how important it is to master the dynamics of working with other people. “You have to find the right people,” he said. “It’s all about people. Just work your way around those difficulties. Know how to deal with them.”

Photo by Christian Joudrey on Unsplash

Figure out what is the right role for you.
There are so many facets to the entertainment industry and so many different ways that you can be involved. It is important to do research and gain experience to figure out what role is the best for you, because it may not always be the one you initially think.

From high school on, Montella dreamed of moving to LA and being a talent publicist. She worked hard to make that dream a reality and landed a job as a talent account associate at BWR. However, once she was actually living her dream, she realized that it was not the right fit for her and that her career aspirations would have to change. She had been so focused on this one path for so long that she didn’t know what else was out there, so she had to start from the beginning and figure out what it is she really wanted to do.

Eventually, she stumbled into a role in the Entertainment division of a consumer PR firm called HUNTER. She spent five years there working at the intersection of brands and entertainment. Now Montella works with the Brooklyn Nets to align their brand identity with like-minded sponsors and create “interesting, innovating and fun” partnerships. By working in roles that operate in different segments of the entertainment industry, Montella has been able to hone in on what specific aspects of the industry she enjoys in order to inform her career path moving forward.

Work hard and be resourceful.
In the entertainment industry, you are constantly put into situations where you have to think on your feet and make decisions quickly. White, Montella and May all stressed how important it is for you to be resourceful and make the right decisions.

White highlighted how being able to rely solely on yourself to handle high-pressure situations is necessary, because there isn’t always going to be someone around to help you, and clients are going to expect you to have answers and know what to do. “At the end of the day, everyone is super busy and super slammed most the time, so you are kind of on your own and you have to have confidence in a situation that most people would never feel comfortable with,” she said.

Don’t overlook the simple things.
White noted that tasks as simple as having an organized email or knowing how to properly handle phones go a long way in this industry. Regarding email, she said that “especially in a job as an assistant, it is extremely important to save basically any and every email your boss is sending you with any relevant information because they may ask for it again.” You never want to have to tell your boss that you deleted the email they need.

A lot of the younger professionals entering the workforce might not have experience using phones in a business setting, such as transferring calls. White stressed that for simple tasks like this it is always better to just ask someone to show you how to do it upfront, rather than getting into a situation where you end up messing something important up because you didn’t know how to do it. “At some point, it is just important to admit, ‘I don’t know how to do this, would you please show me,’ she explained. “It is something simple, and people will most likely be happy to show it to you. If you are already working there and already have the job, what do you have to lose?”

Photo by Ahmet Yalçınkaya on Unsplash

It’s not always going to be glamorous, but it will be worth it.
Lots of people are drawn to the glitz and glamour of showbiz, without considering all of the hard work that actually goes into things. The reality is that there is going to be a lot of grunt work involved, especially when you are just starting out.

Everybody has to start somewhere, and in entertainment that usually means as someone’s assistant. Inevitably grunt work will be involved, but, as White noted, the key is to become an assistant to someone who also allows you to work alongside them and ask them questions to learn and grow and eventually take on more tasks. “How you can help yourself get there,” she said, “is by becoming as independent and as resourceful as you possibly can. To really soak up everything that they are saying and giving to you, and any emails that you are copied on, to really be paying attention to them and putting things together piece by piece.”

If you are passionate about working in the entertainment industry, it isn’t going to feel like work at all. May said that he loves that he gets “to work and have a job that is really fun and get paid to do it. In something that I have always loved doing. I can wake up in the morning and be excited about going to my job.” Montella said that the fact that she truly cares about the industry makes the countless hours of work worth it. Her advice is to “understand that there is a ton of grunt work and that it doesn’t ever get easier, but if this is what you’re passionate about, the juice will be worth the squeeze.”

The post That’s Showbiz Baby: Insider Advice for Succeeding in Entertainment PR appeared first on Platform Magazine.

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“Starting up” a Startup: Swoptop https://platformmagazine.org/2019/10/23/starting-up-a-startup-swoptop/ Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:42:59 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20648 Published on October 23, 2019, at 6:42 p.m. by Ali Cushing. The term “startup” has been bandied around at an increasing rate over the past few years describing young ventures taken by opportunists, such as the creation of hip new apps and small business proposals. According to Forbes “a startup is a company working to solve a [...]

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Published on October 23, 2019, at 6:42 p.m. by Ali Cushing.

The term “startup” has been bandied around at an increasing rate over the past few years describing young ventures taken by opportunists, such as the creation of hip new apps and small business proposals. According to Forbes “a startup is a company working to solve a problem where the solution is not obvious and success is not guaranteed.”

Startup clothing rental company Swoptop, founded by Chase Healey, is a prime example of this definition ringing true. Swoptop is an online platform that aims to bring college women together to rent their clothes on campus.

Courtesy of Louise Margeson

One may ask, what problem is Swoptop solving? University of Alabama Campus Coordinator Louise Margeson stated, “In today’s world, women need last-minute outfit options for many different occasions. Swoptop aims to be the solution to this problem by creating a community for college women centered around renting clothes. We empower our users to build their own marketplace and provide our users with new options for getting dressed.”

The Swoptop marketplace allows for college women to view and potentially rent a wide variety of clothing from others. Swoptop launched at The University of Alabama on Oct. 1, and now has over 500 online users.

Any business or startup in its early stages inevitably has its ups and downs, and Swoptop is no exception. Healey explained that the first version of Swoptop was created in 2012. She attended Ohio State where she and her friend, who was a developer, combined forces to “create an app where girls could keep track of where their shared clothes were.”

Despite the initial launch’s failure, Healey hung on to the desire to come up with a solution to this problem. She worked for a startup company that focused on student travel to learn skills that would translate to Swoptop if she decided to pursue it again. After working for startup companies, talent agents and music managers she realized that if she didn’t revisit Swoptop she would “regret the opportunity to help young women, which is [her] true passion.” It is important for anyone running a new business venture to understand that the first swing may be a miss.

The Swoptop team made many essential branding, marketing and PR moves in order to create a worthwhile product for their target audience — tactics that any new business owner can benefit from using.

Courtesy of Swoptop

When establishing a business, you should understand that your brand is your everything. While deciding on Swoptop’s brand image, Healey said she “looked at the most successful apps on her phone — which at the time was SoundCloud whose color is bright orange, Snapchat’s bright yellow, Twitter’s bright blue and so on.” Following along with the bright color trend was a positive move for the startup, considering color has been known to have a powerful psychological impact on people’s behaviors and decisions. Research conducted by Small Business Trends found that “93% of buyers said they focus on visual appearance, and close to 85% claim color is a primary reason when they make a purchase.”

Another important branding move for all business owners to consider is creating an image or voice that will resonate with your potential consumers. When it came to making decisions that were deeper than colors and icons, Healey and Margeson branded Swoptop as a community for its users.

Courtesy of Greg McKillop

Margeson explained that “throughout the process of creating Swoptop’s brand, Chase and I really wanted to highlight the company’s values: authentic, bold and confident. Our biggest priority has been to maintain a brand image that feels honest and transparent with our users.”

Healey noted that the company has done little marketing, in light of wanting to grow with its users and really listen to their opinions. She stated, “I wanted to hear from the ‘first movers’ or the first users about things they wanted to improve on the platform first before really spreading the word with marketing initiatives.”

“To really emphasize our goal for Swoptop, we created three promotional videos explaining the how, why and what of the brand,” Margeson explained. “These allowed us to let our personalities shine through and make the brand feel personal and authentic. Also, digital media content is so important today — especially with our demographic.”

Research conducted by the Swoptop team found that the share-economy is on-trend. Swoptop capitalized on this trend while also adding a personalized touch, allowing the company to stand out amongst other clothing rental or resale sites. The research conducted also established the Swoptop target demographic to be Gen Z — the generation that grew up during a recession, focuses on saving money, are mobile natives and prefer brands that feel authentic. The most positive PR-driven step that Swoptop has taken is putting a large emphasis on building and maintaining relationships with its target audience.

Healey emphasized her strong belief that “this demographic has the highest need for this kind of business and is completely being ignored. A lot of peer-to-peer rental companies focus on luxury items in an older demographic, but this age demographic has more social events than any other age group, and they’re local, so their exchanges can happen more seamlessly.”

Margeson explained how Swoptop has “created a really strong network on campus of over 30 girls, which [she leads] on a day-to-day basis. The rep community is a great place for college women to explore their talents through real-world experience, outside of the classroom.”

Courtesy of Greg McKillop

In addition to creating the community aspect behind the site, Healey is hoping to “give girls tools that they can apply to the real world. In terms of if they want to start their own business or even just little financial tools that no one ever teaches you in school.”

Setting creative and monetary goals and preparing for the future is important in any business. In regard to the future of Swoptop, Healey stated, “Our focus is going toward getting more people to rent and be more comfortable with how renting works. … We plan on updating our platform in the next few weeks in order to make it an easier process, which was in response to feedback we received from our users.”

Healey added, “In terms of broader expansion, first and foremost the goal this year is really to make this the best possible platform for University of Alabama students. We have girls on the waitlist from 20 different schools who are already wanting it on their campuses; we just don’t believe in expanding until we nail down the business model. … Every girl deserves the opportunity to make money, look good and feel good.”

Swoptop is a prime example of how PR truly pays off when “starting up” a startup. Having the startup’s business model revolve around its target audience’s input and prosperity allows it to be profitable in many ways, for its users and founders alike.

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FlyteVu: Crafting Authentic Partnerships https://platformmagazine.org/2019/10/21/flytevu-crafting-authentic-partnerships/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 21:28:58 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20579 Published on October 21, 2019, at 4:30 p.m. by Ally Denton. Nashville-based agency FlyteVu connects brands to consumers through music, pop culture and entertainment. Established only four years ago, it has created various wildly successful campaigns like the Dolly Parton + Pentatonix “Jolene” remix for Cracker Barrel and the Serena Williams x Bumble “In Her [...]

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Published on October 21, 2019, at 4:30 p.m. by Ally Denton.

Nashville-based agency FlyteVu connects brands to consumers through music, pop culture and entertainment. Established only four years ago, it has created various wildly successful campaigns like the Dolly Parton + Pentatonix “Jolene” remix for Cracker Barrel and the Serena Williams x Bumble “In Her Court” collaboration. FlyteVu’s approach to these strategic partnerships allows its clients to reach their

target audiences and build their brand identities.

In a Huffpost article, Laura Hutfless, FlyteVu’s co-founder, said, “There was a gap in the industry for a neutral agency that sits inside the music/entertainment industry and works on behalf of brands. We started FlyteVu to fill that void.” The agency begins ideating with its clients’ goals in mind and develops custom campaigns that amplify and extend the brands’ stories.

Photo by Austin Wills on Unsplash

Music is a universal language and plays a major role in FlyteVu’s campaigns and brand partnerships. Director of Public Relations Natalie Logan explained, “At FlyteVu, we know [music] is a bridge of communication to any audience that a brand wants to reach — and if we can leave a consumer feeling an emotion they will never forget, we have filled the gap between connecting a brand to a consumer.”

FlyteVu assisted Cracker Barrel in its mission to reach a younger audience while maintaining relevance with its core consumers. To accomplish this goal, FlyteVu paired Dolly Parton with Pentatonix, an a capella group, to perform “Jolene” to support the release of Parton’s exclusive edition “Pure & Simple” album debuting at Cracker Barrel. The collaboration was filmed on a set that resembled the quintessential Cracker Barrel front porch and was released on Pentatonix’s YouTube page, reaching millions of younger fans.

Their “Jolene” remix resulted in Parton winning her first Grammy award for the famous song, over 40 years after its release. FlyteVu surpassed industry standards by crafting this partnership and creating the first brand-powered Grammy win. This campaign exemplifies how FlyteVu’s strategic partnerships and innovative ideas assist clients in reaching their goals.

Selecting appropriate talent for partnerships directly contributes to the success of a campaign. Logan emphasized that the number one priority in selecting talent is “that the talent resonates with the demographic we are targeting, and that the audience views the talent as a trusted voice.” She mentioned that examining a talent’s social media following and demographics and noting if they’re releasing new work are vital to finding what works. Logan added, “There is, of course, a deeper vetting process to ensure the talent truly aligns with the brand’s mission, vision and values.”

Developing authentic partnerships is essential to furthering a brand’s story and ensuring consumer acclaim. Whitney Byerly, the director of creative and talent at FlyteVu, noted that “when an artist collaborates with a brand, and when done authentically and strategically, the affinity transfers to the fan.”

“The partnership has to make sense for the talent and brand. Writing a check to a big name and hoping it connects with an audience just doesn’t work. Consumers are way too smart,” stated Logan. FlyteVu focuses on authenticity when matching talent and brands — as seen in its recent campaigns for Bumble, a social networking app, which featured big names, Serena Williams and Jameela Jamil.

FlyteVu was challenged with tying Bumble’s mission of “making the first move” with notable talent that would help amplify this message. The agency connected Bumble with Serena Williams to create the “In Her Court” campaign — reminding women they have the power to make the first move. Bumble stated that this partnership would “reinforce the brand’s mission to end misogyny and empower women around the

Image courtesy of Adweek

world.” The “In Her Court” campaign garnered one billion earned media impressions and over two million views of the commercial on YouTube — proving that FlyteVu knows what it’s doing when pairing talent and brands.

FlyteVu also assisted in teaming up actress and activist Jameela Jamil with Bumble to combat the worrying social issue of widespread loneliness. According to a Cigna study, about 60% of Gen Z have felt left out or isolated from others. The “#AskingForAFriend” campaign launched on International Friendship Day and focuses on normalizing “the need to form new friendships throughout life and supporting women to do so” (Harper’s Bazaar).

Byerly noted that “Serena’s and Jameela’s campaigns were thoughtful to what talent is passionate about while coinciding with brand mission and campaign. The campaigns were also not single-dimensional like many talent campaigns, but rather were multi-touchpoint; they involved social/digital strategies, PR, event, content, charity, etc.”

Logan acknowledged these campaigns with Williams and Jamil wouldn’t have made sense, or connected as well as they did, had they partnered with anyone else. However, she advises other brands to remember “that it doesn’t take a big name like Serena or Jameela to increase awareness. Those kinds of deals might be years down the road for a brand, but there are still incredible opportunities for companies to partner with talent and make a huge impact.”

Brands should know the value of their owned and controlled assets. Logan suggests asking questions like, “What marketing assets does your brand have to support a partner’s initiatives? Is there a charitable component that is a ‘win’ for talent?” She asserted that “all of these things play into a celebrity deal. It is all about identifying the assets your brand internally controls, proving their worth, and using them the right way.”

Identifying a brand’s value and strategically partnering with a celebrity drives “consumers to buy, attend, download, follow or participate in your brand’s call to action or barrier of entry,” according to Logan. This step is crucial for campaigns and often leads to improved brand awareness and consumer interest.

Photo by John Mark Arnold on Unsplash

Byerly noted that “the majority of our agency comes from an entertainment background, so through our relationships, we have lots of ears to the ground on what and who is coming down the pipeline.” For FlyteVu, strategic relationships play directly into the creative process of the campaign. Selecting appropriate partners brings a campaign to life and creates unique, robust opportunities for brands and talent alike.

FlyteVu, named in AdWeek’s 100: Fastest Growing Agencies, continues to make headlines by executing compelling campaigns. The use of calculated brand and talent pairings and innovative strategies allow FlyteVu to break barriers in the entertainment and music PR industry. For more information about the agency, visit its website flytevu.com.

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Understanding the Misunderstood: Health Care Public Relations https://platformmagazine.org/2019/10/15/understanding-the-misunderstood-health-care-public-relations/ Tue, 15 Oct 2019 00:32:19 +0000 https://platformmagazine.org/?p=20554 Published on October 14, 2019, at 7:32 p.m. by Justine Groeber. As one of public relations’ biggest growth areas, health care PR generates over 15% of a member firm’s revenue. Oftentimes when one thinks of public relations, sports or entertainment PR comes to mind, while health care communications is often overlooked. The ever-changing, fast-paced environment undoubtedly [...]

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Published on October 14, 2019, at 7:32 p.m.
by Justine Groeber.

As one of public relations’ biggest growth areas, health care PR generates over 15% of a member firm’s revenue. Oftentimes when one thinks of public relations, sports or entertainment PR comes to mind, while health care communications is often overlooked.

The ever-changing, fast-paced environment undoubtedly makes health care one of the most dynamic communication fields. More than that, health care public relations positively impacts the world around us by providing patients and health care providers with the information they need. Weber Shandwick Senior Associate Blair Martin emphasized that communicating awareness about drugs and diseases positively impacts patients, their loved ones, doctors, nurses and others.

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash

Similarly, Wendy Dougherty, senior director of communications at Medtronic, said that health care public relations helps people have the right conversations with their physicians in order to get the best care. This is what allows health care PR professionals to realize the reach of their messaging — when public awareness and sales increase (DMN News).

The complex nature of health care sectors such as pharmaceuticals and medical technology may be what causes people to misunderstand these communication areas. With this being said, here is what you might not know about the lesser-known PR health care industry.

No background in health care is required.
Contrary to popular belief, there is no need for an extensive background in health care in order to start off in the industry. Dougherty stressed, “You need to have a passion and interest in it but the details you can learn through experience, reading, talking to people.”

While no background is necessary, Martin explained that professionals must be prepared to face a learning curve. “You have to be ready to be a sponge and soak it all in,” she explained. “When you’re servicing clients that directly impact the landscape of how our country and world are cared for and treated … you really have to be willing to listen and learn.”

Health care communication is just as creative as other sectors.
One common misconception about health care communication is that it’s not as creatively driven as other fields, due to rules and regulations. Dougherty disagreed, saying, “There is room to be creative but it’s a more strategic creativity that is required.”

Photo by Marcelo Leal on Unsplash

In the health care industry, it is important to recognize that each target audience requires an individualized message that distributes the appropriate information to each one, according to DMN News. With pharmaceutical companies “pushing to be more creative, and as the people who counsel them, it is even more important for us to stay on top of our game in every creative aspect possible,” Martin said.

“The number one thing that you need to be able to do is create compelling content that drives your business objective,” Dougherty stated. This is where strategic creativity comes in: How can communications professionals talk about health care areas in new and exciting ways?

Health care work isn’t all black and white.
From the outside, it may seem that health care communication is very black and white, but it’s not. “Every day is never what you think it’s going to be,” Dougherty said.

Both Dougherty and Martin stressed that each day is a new and exciting challenge in their field. Not only does the constantly changing environment keep their jobs interesting, but knowing that the work they do makes a positive impact on the world is even more rewarding. “It’s really inspiring to work with people who are all working to communicate various issues that go on in our society,” Martin said.

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash

While it’s not common to host an extravagant launch party for the newest medical breakthrough, it isn’t to say that health care doesn’t have these kinds of campaigns. Martin stated, “There are health care consumer campaigns — we see them all the time.” The senior associate specifically mentioned the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge as one of the most popular campaigns of this kind. “When you’re getting so many people to do that kind of thing … that’s pretty cool,” she said.

Learning about health care communication produces a more holistic understanding of the diverse public relations industry. After comprehending health care PR, the complex nature of the information is a lot less intimidating. The work is rewarding and provides valuable information to patients, their loved ones, medical professionals and more.

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